Stop 2:

Beechwood Cemetery

Learn about Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce, Duncan Campbell Scott, and

Nicholas Flood Davin

Welcome to Beechwood Cemetery, the National Cemetery of Canada.

At this stop, we will learn about three men whose beliefs and decisions had significant impacts of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples. We will learn important lessons from each one of them, and we'll ask you to think about how your decisions and actions can make huge differences.

Step 1: Learn

Learn about Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce, Duncan Campbell Scott, and Nicholas Flood Davin.

Learn about Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce,

Duncan Campbell Scott, and Nicholas Flood Davin


Learn More!

"Finding Heart"

Learn more about Dr. Bryce!

"Reconciliation Begins with You and Me"

Learn from young people why reconciliation matters and how you can help make a difference.

Step 2: Honour


  • Write a letter to Peter Henderson Bryce- what have you learned from him? What would you like to thank him for?

  • Take a photo of your letter to Dr. Bryce and /or a photo of yourself at Dr. Bryce's grave and share on social media using the hashtag: #ReimagineCanadaDay2021

  • Read Spirit Bear's Guide to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Calls to Action and choose one call to action to commit to in your life. Tweet/Share your commitment using the hashtags: #ReimagineCanadaDay2021 #CalledtoAction #Spirit Bear


Step 3: Take Action!

  1. Learn about how First Nations Kids are still not getting the services they need. Read Spirit Bear and Children Make History and then write a letter to the PM , your MP, and the Ministers of Indigenous Services and Crown-Indigenous Relations. Click here for an example letter!

  2. Share what you have learned on social media. Tag the PM, your MP, and the Ministers of Indigenous Services and Crown-Indigenous Relations to demand that the government immediately comply with all rulings by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ordering it to immediately cease its discriminatory funding of First Nations child and family services.


The Residential schools’ poor ventilation combined with their prison-like atmosphere appalled Bryce, who wrote that it was “almost as if the prime conditions for the outbreak of epidemics had been deliberately created.”